Laetitia Lina

Exhibitions

John Havens Thornton: Vertical / Horizontal / Diagonal at UMASS Dartmouth, MA

Laetitia Lina - Tuesday, August 30, 2016

From September 15 to October 30, 2016, The University Gallery of UMASS Dartmouth presents JOHN HAVENS THORNTON: Vertical / Horizontal / Diagonal.

 

Abstract geometric paintings by New Bedford artist John Havens Thornton (b. 1933). Thornton has exhibited since the early 1960s, notably at the ICA, Boston (1967), the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1970), the Whitney Museum of American Art (1967), the Rose Art Museum, Waltham, MA (1979), the De Cordova Museum, Lincoln, MA (1987), and the New Bedford Art Museum, MA (2004).

www1.umassd.edu


SaveSave Read More

John Havens Thornton at Amstel Gallery, the Yard, NYC

Laetitia Lina - Tuesday, September 08, 2015

From September 15, 2015 to January 15, 2016, L&L ARTS and Amstel Gallery presents JOHN HAVENS THORNTON: A Survey of painting spanning 50 years, 1964 - 2014, at The Yard (Floor 2 to 5), 234 Fith Av, NY. Curated by Gregory de la Haba and Laetitia Lina. Opening reception brunch: Sunday October 11 from 1 to 3pm.


The retrospective - spanning fifty years of paintings by American artist John Havens Thornton (b.1933) - marks the first show the artist has had in New York since his work was included in the Whitney Museum’s “Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting” in 1967. The roster of artists from that year's exhibition reads a compilation of names synonymous with stunning achievement in American art including William de Kooning, Roy Lichtenstein, Agnes Martin, Joan Mitchell, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, Edward Ruscha, Andrew Wyeth, Jasper Johns, Cy Twombly, Jim Dine, Helen Frankenthaler, Alex Katz, Robert Indiana, Georgia O'Keeffe, and others.

Born to American parents in Mexico City in 1933, Thornton graduated Princeton in 1955 with classmate Frank Stella (also in the 1967 Whitney show). While at Princeton, Thornton studied methods of abstract expressionism under the renowned William Seitz, the first Princeton Professor awarded a PhD in modern art -writing who penned some of the earliest major texts on Abstract Expressionism and eventually became an influential curator at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. It wasn't until the 1960s -when Thornton abandoned the splashy and gestural emotionalism of the Ab-Ex movement and sought a more subtle and minimalist approach to painting- that he found his own voice as artist. Thornton’s new-found expression of reductive work was selected for inclusion in the Whitney Museum‘s 1967 show - the exhibition that would later become the Whitney Biennale.

It is from this pivotal moment in the early 1960's that curators Gregory de la Haba and Laetitia Lina begin their survey of Thornton's lifelong career dedicated to pictorial expression.

Rich with ambiguities of space and color, Thornton explains his work as "searching for the meaning of line as an edge or a direction that attempts to describe a spatial event." According Roger Mandle, former Director of the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., these paintings from the 1960's are Thornton’s “intuitive exercises in which lines paradoxically ‘undefine space’ through his exquisitely lean color palette and simplified forms. Against neutral colored backgrounds, Thornton has painted the elemental outlines of archetypal domestic shapes: shoes, trees, towers, and others suggesting forms that demand space for their presence. By the use of subtle transitions of color within these lines, he flattens the forms to abstractions that become cyphers for themselves. Thus the lines defy or ‘ruin’ space and form so that we must confront his paintings as abstract exercises of great beauty and pleasure."

About the Artist
John Havens Thornton lives and works in New Bedford, Massachusetts. In 1963 he became professor of Art at the Massachusetts College of Art where he taught studio art and the philosophy of art until 1984. Selected exhibitions include: Robert Hamilton/John Havens Thornton - Selected New Paintings, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA (1967), Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, Whitney Museum, NY (1967), Solo exhibition, Museum of Fine Art, Boston, MA (1970), Visual Memoirs curated by Carl Belz, Rose Art Museum, Waltham, MA (1979), Landscape as Metaphor: The Transcendental Vision, Fitchburg Art Museum, Fitchburg, MA (1993), Landscape as Metaphor: The Transcendental Vision, Newport Art Museum, RI (1994), Triennial, Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, MA (1999), John Thornton Paintings: A Retrospective, New Bedford Art Museum, MA (2004), Line + Relation, John and Charles Thornton, Gelb Gallery, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA (2010).

“Art is the coherent expression of personality.”
John Havens Thornton.


Gallery Information
Amstel Gallery at The Yard
234 Fifth Avenue, Floors 2 - 5
New York, New York, NY 10001

October 6, 2015 – January 15, 2016
Monday – Friday 10am – 5pm and by appointment
Opening Reception Brunch: Sunday: October 11, from 1 – 3pm

To make an appointment or to learn more about the exhibition please contact Gregory bodegadelahaba@gmail.com or Laetitia - laetitia@llarts.com.   

Media Contacts:
Helen Allen: E: helen@allencooper.com, T: (917) 843 3544

 

 

 

Read More

John Havens Thornton at Josee Bienvenu Gallery, NYC

Laetitia Lina - Sunday, March 01, 2015

From July 9 to August 29, 2015, L&L ARTS presents JOHN HAVENS THORNTON: The Layers, at Josee Bienvenu Gallery, NY. Opening reception: Thursday July 9, 2015 from 6 to 8pm.

This exhibition brings together a selection of 1960s paintings by American artist John Havens Thornton.

Thornton first explored and analyzed abstraction, with fellow classmate Frank Stella, under the guidance of William Seitz at Princeton University in the mid 1950s. Seitz, who later became the first person in 1955 awarded a PhD in modern art from Princeton University, wrote some of the earliest major texts on Abstract Expressionism and had strong influence on John Thornton's work. In the early 1960s Thornton's work developed a mature approach to minimal and conceptual pictorial expression. While his forms grew linear and the references became figurative, the focus shifted on the structure, meanings and emotions associated to shapes and colors. In 1967, the curators of the Whitney Museum of American Art selected Thornton "Tree" series to be featured in the "Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American painting" - the exhibition that would later become the Whitney Biennale.

John Thornton's reductive paintings from the 1960's are rich with ambiguities of space and color. Thornton explains these works as searching for the meaning of line as an edge or a direction that attempts to describe a spatial event. These paintings are his intuitive exercises in which lines paradoxically "undefine space" through his exquisitely lean color palette and simplified forms. Against neutral colored backgrounds, Thornton has painted the elemental outlines of archetypal domestic shapes: shoes, trees, towers, and others suggesting forms that demand space for their presence. By the use of subtle transitions of color within these lines, he flattens the forms to abstractions that become cyphers for themselves. Thus the lines defy or "ruin" space and form so that we must confront his paintings as abstract exercises of great beauty and pleasure. 

Thornton's engineering study and early work as an industrial designer have imbued his paintings with a clean logic; but he turns this logic on itself. Rather than solving visual problems as would a designer, Thornton uses these skills to describe profound visual and philosophical questions about the nature of perception and reality. It is as if Thornton was seeking in his paintings to confirm ineffable issues of his own being, while making beautiful reductions of what he thinks he saw. 

In "The Layers," Stanley Kunitz, one of Thornton's poet heroes, has written; "I have walked through many lives / some of them my own / and I am not who I was / though some principle of being / abides, from which I struggle / not to stray."  John Thornton's lovely wanderings through the illogic of the deceptive lines in his work ponder similar concerns about identity.

Roger Mandle, 2015

 

John Havens Thornton is an American artist, born in Mexico City in 1933. He lives and works in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Thornton studied painting at Princeton University and graduated in 1955. In 1963 he became professor of Art at the Massachusetts College of Art and taught studio art and philosophy of art until 1984. Selected exhibitions include: Robert Hamilton/John Havens Thornton - Selected New Paintings, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, MA (1967), Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American painting, Whitney Museum, NY (1967), Solo exhibition, Museum of Fine Art, Boston, MA (1970), Visual Memoirs curated by Carl Belz, Rose Art Museum, Waltham, MA (1979), Landscape as Metaphor: The Transcendental Vision, Fitchburg Art Museum, Fitchburg, MA (1993), Landscape as Metaphor: The Transcendental Vision, Newport Art Museum, RI (1994), Triennial, Fuller Museum of Art, Brockton, MA (1999), John Thornton Paintings: A Retrospective, New Bedford Art Museum, MA (2004), Line + Relation, John and Charles Thornton, Gelb Gallery, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA (2010).

Art historian Roger Mandle was Deputy Director and Chief Curator of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. from 1988 to 1993, and president of The Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, RI, until 2008. After leaving his post at RISD Mandle assumed the directorial position at the Qatar Museums Authority.

 

For further information, please contact us: info@llarts.com

Exhibition on view from July 9th at:
Josée Bienvenu gallery
529 West 20th Street
(between 10th & 11th Avenues)
New York, NY 10011
Tel 212 206 7990
joseebienvenugallery.com

Open hours:
10am - 6pm
Tuesday through Saturday
 

 

 

Read More

Pablo Guarderas, I am that I am, Grand Gallery, NYC

Laetitia Lina - Saturday, February 28, 2015

From April 8 to May 9, 2015, L&L ARTS presents PABLO GUARDERAS: I AM THAT I AM, a solo exhibition at 317 Grand Gallery, NYC. 

I AM THAT I AM will feature a new body of photographic works by Pablo Guarderas. 

"The central theme in my work is the exploration within the Self. It is the central theme in my life and I see it in many aspects in my work. I want to inspire a journey within, and to evoke different aspects of that state. Silence, peace, beauty.  In I AM THAT I AM, I see a map to the within that highlights several states of that journey. I use sacred geometry as a symbol of the Divine and as an aim in itself" Pablo Guarderas

Since his early exhibitions, Guarderas has been juxtaposing and contrasting aesthetic languages that shatter the surface of matter, drawing the viewer inward towards an alternative spiritual reality. In the two large scale works featured in I am that I am (analog photographic and mixed media works), the individual panes coalesce into a window offering a view of bodies in motion, the many facets of a universal truth projecting on our own inner landscape. Guarderas' beautifully stylized and vividly constructed images of female bodies question relations and boundaries between body and space, performance and photography, matter and Self-consciousness.

Born in Quito, Ecuador in 1964, Pablo Guarderas lives and work in New-York. He exhibited across America and Europe, and recently at the Biennial Cuenca, Ecuador and the Whitechappel Gallery, London. Pablo Guarderas work is featured in the following public collections: Victoria & Albert Museum, UK ; Citi Bank, UK ; Kodak Collection, UK ; Sisley Paris, France.

For further information please contact us: info@llarts.com -  M: +1 (0) 347 754 1886

Open April 8 to May 9, 2015
Wednesday to Saturday, 11am to 6pm
April 9, 2015: Opening reception, 6 to 9pm

317 Grand Gallery (317 Grand St, between Allen St and Orchard St), New-York, NY 10002.

 

 

Read More

Ryan Ostrowski, Tribal Pop * Residency, Grand Gallery, NYC

Laetitia Lina - Tuesday, February 24, 2015

From February 27 to March 28, 2015, L&L ARTS and Isis Phoenix Arts present RYAN OSTROWSKI: TRIBAL POP * RESIDENCY, a solo exhibition and artist residency at Grand Gallery, NYC.

Ryan Ostrowski's TRIBAL POP features canvases & works on paper painted between 2012 and 2014, characterized by the artist's emblematic statement on contemporary culture blending an uncanny Surrealist sensibility with popular iconography and references to tribal art.

Ostrowski has been a filmmaker since his teens, and embraces painting as a link to an interest in facial expression, and to parallel, a paradoxical fascination with masks, which conceal facial expression. These outlets converge in the contemporary cult of celebrity. Celebrities present a mask to the world which is a simplified alter ego; a selectively condensed and commercially valuable individuality.

Ryan Ostrowski: TRIBAL POP unfolds the artist's line of inquiry into societal malfunction, and questioning the overwhelming hyper-tech, social media-obsessed and sensationalist attitudes of the Now. Ostrowski writes, "What does it all mean? These little pieces that fit together so perfectly. I look no further than the mask. It's heavy on my heart and mind because I wear one. I have from an early age, and he does, and she does and you do too."

British Art Historian  Edward Lucie-Smith has written:
"Ostrowski's 'TRIBAL POP' with keen intelligence and a well-developed sense of humor, is presenting us with a modern harlequinade. In the same way his forbear G.D. Tiepolo achieved with his wonderful series of drawings illustrating the life and adventures of Punchinello (who, of course, wears a grotesque mask). Ostrowski's examination of Early Modernism, his ironic relationship with '60s Pop (which took itself much more seriously than he does) and his experience with moving images, equip him to present the culture of modern celebrity as a comic-ironic spectacle. Into this he is even able to introduce major images from the past, because these too have in a certain sense become 'celebs'. It's the only way we can deal with them, in terms of the culture we now possess."

Ostrowski conceived of his first body of work while travelling through North America, before returning to New York City to explore symbolism, visual language, and the role of the "mask" in western culture. The works on view are exemplary of the complex fluid patterns, wide color palette and the intersection between this device and the subject, making Ostrowski's work dynamic and arresting.

Ryan Ostrowski was born in Vermont (USA) in 1986. A developed interest in filmmaking drew Ostrowski to the arts at a young age. Through his teens he wrote and produced a great number of short films, most of which depict people in vulnerable situations, oppressed by a menacing masked character. A link to an interest in facial expression can be traced to these early films, concurrent to an interest in the horror genre of American cinema and the films of Stanley Kubrick. The mask would continue to make its way into his matured college films and later materialize once again as a metaphor in his paintings. Ostrowski studied film production and cinematography at Keene State College in New Hampshire, graduating in 2008. During these years, Ostrowski continued to examine storytelling through the lens, further magnifying people and expanding on characters. The focus of his late academic work is lent to video portraits and identity studies. As narrative was being stripped of the films, Ostrowski came to appreciate images by themselves, and the focus soon shifted from moving pictures to still pictures. His aesthetic retains much of his cine sensibility, as a filmic emphasis on the power of nonverbal communication is captured in many works. Consequently, his paradoxical fascination with the mask and the emphasis of facial expression converge on the platform of celebrity culture. Ostrowski shares with many other self-taught artists an individualized style. He is known for portraiture that is heavily fragmented with symbols and motifs, which revert to Early Modernist Primitivism, enfolding both tribal and pop. His work synthesizes the Warholian idiom of the 60's, the markings of Modernism and the fame monster culture that defines our own zeitgeist. Ostrowski lives and works in New York.

Ryan Ostrowski will be working in residence for the duration of the exhibition. 

For further information please contact us: info@llarts.com -  M: +1 (0) 347 754 1886

Open February 27 to March 28, 2015
Tuesday to Saturday, 10amd to 6pm
March 3, 2015: Opening reception, 6 to 9pm

317 Grand St (between Allen St and Orchard St), New-York, NY 10002.

 

Read More

Solo exhibition: Ryan Ostrowski, Tribal Pop, NYC

Laetitia Lina - Wednesday, September 10, 2014

From December 11 to 20, 2014, L&L ARTS and Isis Phoenix Arts present TRIBAL POP the first solo exhibition of Ryan Ostrowski at 168 Bowery, NYC.

Ryan Ostrowski's TRIBAL POP features canvases & works on paper painted between 2012 and 2014, characterized by the artist's emblematic statement on contemporary culture blending an uncanny Surrealist sensibility with popular iconography and references to tribal art.

Ostrowski has been a filmmaker since his teens, and embraces painting as a link to an interest in facial expression, and to parallel, a paradoxical fascination with masks, which conceal facial expression. These outlets converge in the contemporary cult of celebrity. Celebrities present a mask to the world which is a simplified alter ego; a selectively condensed and commercially valuable individuality.

Ryan Ostrowski: TRIBAL POP unfolds the artist's line of inquiry into societal malfunction, and questioning the overwhelming hyper-tech, social media-obsessed and sensationalist attitudes of the Now. Ostrowski writes, "What does it all mean? These little pieces that fit together so perfectly. I look no further than the mask. It's heavy on my heart and mind because I wear one. I have from an early age, and he does, and she does and you do too."

British Art Historian  Edward Lucie-Smith has written:
"Ostrowski's 'TRIBAL POP' with keen intelligence and a well-developed sense of humor, is presenting us with a modern harlequinade. In the same way his forbear G.D. Tiepolo achieved with his wonderful series of drawings illustrating the life and adventures of Punchinello (who, of course, wears a grotesque mask). Ostrowski's examination of Early Modernism, his ironic relationship with '60s Pop (which took itself much more seriously than he does) and his experience with moving images, equip him to present the culture of modern celebrity as a comic-ironic spectacle. Into this he is even able to introduce major images from the past, because these too have in a certain sense become 'celebs'. It's the only way we can deal with them, in terms of the culture we now possess."

Ostrowski conceived of his first body of work while travelling through North America, before returning to New York City to explore symbolism, visual language, and the role of the "mask" in western culture. The works on view are exemplary of the complex fluid patterns, wide color palette and the intersection between this device and the subject, making Ostrowski's work dynamic and arresting.

Ryan Ostrowski was born in Vermont (USA) in 1986. A developed interest in filmmaking drew Ostrowski to the arts at a young age. Through his teens he wrote and produced a great number of short films, most of which depict people in vulnerable situations, oppressed by a menacing masked character. A link to an interest in facial expression can be traced to these early films, concurrent to an interest in the horror genre of American cinema and the films of Stanley Kubrick. The mask would continue to make its way into his matured college films and later materialize once again as a metaphor in his paintings. Ostrowski studied film production and cinematography at Keene State College in New Hampshire, graduating in 2008. During these years, Ostrowski continued to examine storytelling through the lens, further magnifying people and expanding on characters. The focus of his late academic work is lent to video portraits and identity studies. As narrative was being stripped of the films, Ostrowski came to appreciate images by themselves, and the focus soon shifted from moving pictures to still pictures. His aesthetic retains much of his cine sensibility, as a filmic emphasis on the power of nonverbal communication is captured in many works. Consequently, his paradoxical fascination with the mask and the emphasis of facial expression converge on the platform of celebrity culture. Ostrowski shares with many other self-taught artists an individualized style. He is known for portraiture that is heavily fragmented with symbols and motifs, which revert to Early Modernist Primitivism, enfolding both tribal and pop. His work synthesizes the Warholian idiom of the 60's, the markings of Modernism and the fame monster culture that defines our own zeitgeist. Ostrowski lives and works in New York.


For further information please contact us: info@llarts.com -  M: +1 (0) 347 754 1886

December 11, 6 to 9pm: Press and Media preview
December 12, 5 to 9pm: Opening reception
December 12 to December 19: 10am to 6pm

168 Bowery (NOLITA, corner of Bowery & Kenmare)
New York, NY 10012
T: 212 966 2842

 

 

Read More

PORTAL an online exhibition for ARTICURATE Sept 11 & 12

Laetitia Lina - Monday, September 08, 2014

September 11 & 12, 2014, L&L Arts presents Portal an online group exhibition for Articurate. www.articurate.net/curated-by

Portal from the Latin porta, meaning entrance or passage through, offers an opening, a frame or object before or around our potential understanding. Stories build their own portals. "Once upon a time" creates a short cut to the heart of the matter, developing a context ambiguous enough to accept our greatest fears and hopes. Moments of transition in Native American stories typically read: "As he continued his aimless wondering…" If the first created an imaginative context for time, the second does the same for space. It is a space between spaces, a no-where, an abstraction, but one with the haunting possibilities of meaning and purpose.
The artists I have selected are not typical storytellers. There is no beginning middle or end to be found in their work. Instead, it is a world of potential, an art of physical and imaginative movement.
Enough words, let's look beyond the portal...

Discover the content of the exhibition on: articurate.net

Read More

Solo exhibition: Pablo Guarderas, Ananda, NYC

Laetitia Lina - Sunday, January 12, 2014

From February 8 to March 28, 2014, L&L ARTS presents ANANDA a solo exhibition of Pablo Guarderas at Melet Mercantile Studio, NYC. ANANDA will feature a  new series of photographs and installation art.

 "Having lost his soul, modern man is in search for a substitute. Neither a careful cultivation of his physical tastes, nor an assiduous nurture of his mental abilities will be of any avail if the spirit in him is stifled and starved. Salvage of the soul is what must be accomplished if the future of man is to be made secure." Mahavatar Babaji

 ANANDA presents a new body of photographic works by Pablo Guarderas alongside a retrospect of works drawn from his search of bliss and completeness. Starting and ending with the notions of eternal search for truth and the re-making of one’s self, Pablo Guarderas work questions the ideas of impermanence and awareness through self realization.

"Ananda - 'bliss' in Pali, Sanskrit – is the show I have been wanting to do all my life because it fully integrates the inspiration, the search, the tools and the processes which lie under the surface of the finalized work. A finished work often has a meaning of its own, distinct yet valid, from the originally intended one. In Ananda, I am able to present my work as a journey, highlighting the depth of the artistic search, and emphasize my belief and dedication to a holistic life approach.”

Since his early exhibitions, Guarderas has been juxtaposing and contrasting aesthetic languages that shatter the surface of matter, drawing the viewer inward towards an alternative spiritual reality. In the four large scale works featured in Ananda (photograms, analog photographic and mixed media works), the individual panes coalesce into a window offering a view of bodies in motion, the many facets of a universal truth projecting on our own inner landscape. Guarderas' beautifully stylized and vividly constructed images of female bodies question relations and boundaries between body and space, performance and photography, soul and consciousness. 

Pablo Guaderas will be working in residence for the duration of the exhibition, sharing not only his inspiration but the process of his work.

Born in Quito, Ecuador in 1964, Pablo Guarderas lives and work in New-York. He exhibited across America and Europe, and recently at the Biennial Cuenca, Ecuador and the Whitechappel Gallery, London. Pablo Guarderas work is featured in the following public collections: Victoria & Albert Museum, UK ; Citi Bank, UK ; Kodak Collection, UK ; Sisley Paris, France.

For further information please contact us:  info@llarts.com - M: +1 (0) 347 754 1886 / + 44 (0) 7802 898 947

10am to 6pm, Monday to Friday
Saturday and Sunday by appointment

Melet Mercantile Studio
84 Wooster Street - Suite 202
New York, NY 10012
T: (212) 925-8353
meletmercantile.com

 

 

 

 

 

Read More

PROJECT/ion 2 at The Old Bowery Station, NYC

Laetitia Lina - Saturday, June 15, 2013

JULY 8 to AUG 2, 2013 PROJECT/ion presents video works by  Doug Foster, Adam Alexander on the screens of The Old Bowery Station.

 

“There are optical illusions in time as well as space.”   Marcel Proust

PROJECT/ion presents a new series of digital films and animations, which draw their inspiration from Optical Art, technology and computer animations.

Doug FOSTER and Adam ALEXANDER take a scientific approach to investigating the realm of the invisible, dismantling the mechanics of vision in order to perceive new opportunities for seeing. Re-examining Optical Art, perceptual abstraction and modern technologies, the video works presented offer an intense and immersive visual experience, typical of the digital era.

British artist Doug Foster produces large-scale digital film installations that play with symmetry and exploit the eye's susceptibility to illusion. PROJECT/ion presents Islands of the Blessed and Dark Place, two video works that similarly aspire to emotionally capture the viewer in a mesmerizing virtual reality. In classical mythology, the Islands of the Blessed were a paradise on earth where favoured mortals were received by the gods. This twelvefold symmetrical film scans a procession of landscapes that have been sculpted by increasingly industrialized cultures. It documents humankind’s transformation of our planet’s natural topography. The specific subject of Dark Place must remain unexplained, but the cyclical, waveform structure of the film is inspired by fundamental forces of nature that seem to operate at every scale in our universe.

American artist and mathematician Adam Alexander creates digital art animations, which challenge and confound the human gaze. He has long been fascinated by the intricacy of our visual system and here presents an impressive inventory of illusions and animated textures. For Adam Alexander composing video animations is a way to create a visual symphony within the dissonance and chaos of the world, what the poet William Blake described as “fearful symmetry”. Animations such as Brush, Mathematical Geology and Solar, have this magnetic vibe and hypnotizing quality, which engage the viewer in an intense and emotional journey.

PROJECT/ion is curated by Laetitia Lina.

Jul 8 to 12: Doug Foster, Dark Place
Jul 15 to 19: Doug Foster, Islands of the blessed
Jul 22 to 26: Adam Alexander, Brush, Solar
Jul 29 to Aug 2 Adam Alexander, Mathematical Geology, Frenzy, Triangle
9 pm to 6 am everyday

The Old Bowery Station
168 Bowery
New York, NY 10012
T: 212 966 2842

www.bowerystation.openhouse.me
www.dougfoster.net

 

LIST OF WORKS

DOUG FOSTER
Islands of the Blessed, 2011
Single-channel digital film installation
35mm colour - stereo sound
3’00” seamless loop
Frameless 55'' HD LCD screen with HD media player
121 x 69 x 10 cm
Ed 3 + 2 AP

DOUG FOSTER

Dark Place, 2013

Single-channel digital film installation
35mm colour - stereo sound
5'18" seamless loop

Frameless 55'' HD LCD screen with HD media player
121 x 69 x 10 cm
Ed 3 + 2 AP 

ADAM ALEXANDER
Mathematical Geology, 2013

Single-channel digital animation
Ed 3 + 2 AP

ADAM ALEXANDER
Solar, 2013

Single-channel digital animation

Ed 3 + 2 AP

 

 

 

Read More

PROJECT/ion at The Old Bowery Station, NYC

Laetitia Lina - Wednesday, May 01, 2013

MAY 7 to 10, 2013, PROJECT/ion presents URBAN DREAMS: video works by Daniel Askill, Joe Hamilton, Rafael Rozendaal, Ken Solomon on the screens of The Old Bowery Station 6pm to 6am.

"Dreams rise in the darkness and catch fire from the mirage of moving light. What happens on the screen isn't quite real; it leaves open a vague cloudy space (…) Hurry hurry, cream yourself full of dreams to carry you through the life that's waiting for you"

Louis Ferdinand Celine, Journey to the end of the night, 1932

PROJECT/ion presents Urban Dreams, a series of video projections where unfamiliar and eerie cityscapes, loom beyond the horizon with a supernatural glow. Daniel Askill, Joe Hamilton, Rafael Rozendaal and Ken Solomon embark us on a chimerical journey where urban landscapes blend with chromatic dreams and digital utopia.

Daniel Askill will present the video work We have decided not to die. A modern day, allegorical triptych where three urban figures undergo transformation through three rituals. Daniel Askill draws his audience in an emotional journey through the power of spirituality, rituals and dreams.

Ken Solomon will show the single channel video Love Letter, where a character played by the artist is seen walking in the street through numerous frames, each frame wiping off the screen. On the way, he passes numerous mailboxes but can never commit to mail the letter he carries. The endless walk in the street becomes a disorienting journey, a senseless dream where everything gets repeated.

Joe Hamilton’s Trouble in Utopia and Survey are two recent video works created through animated collage, numerous layers, transitions and perspectives. They present a disorientating hyper-reality in which what is real and what is fiction are seamlessly blended together so that there is no clear distinction between where one ends and the other begins.

Rafael Rozendaal will present the video works Stagnation means decline and Val avanti, following his line of inquiry into pictorial spaces, geometrical structures and urban outlines. Rozendaal reverses the engineering reality into condensed bits, in a space somewhere between animated cartoons and paintings.

PROJECT/ion is curated by Mark Brown and Laetitia Lina.

May 7: Daniel Askill
May 8: Joe Hamilton
May 9: Rafael Rozendaal
May 10: Ken Solomon
6 pm to 6 am everyday 

The Old Bowery Station
168 Bowery
New York, NY 10012
T: 212 966 2842 

 

 

 

 

Read More